Poland The First Thousand Years
dic07

Poland The First Thousand Years

Patrice M. Dabrowski Poland. The First Thousand Years “The book is very readable and fluidly written. The action flows gracefully from one setting to another with appropriate transitions and cues along the way. Dabrowski’s presentation contributes fresh interpretations of events in several important respects.”—Keely Stauter-Halsted, University of Illinois at Chicago “Dabrowski provides an engaging and reliable overview of over ten...

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Legacies of Violence
dic05

Legacies of Violence

Ed. by Böhler, Jochen / Borodziej, Wlodzimierz / Puttkamer, Joachim von Legacies of Violence: Eastern Europe’s First World War – The First World War began in the Balkans, and it was fought as fiercely in the East as it was in the West. Fighting persisted in the East for almost a decade, radically transforming the political and social order of the entire continent. The specifics of the Eastern war such as mass deportations, ethnic...

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Eugenics and Nation in Early 20th Century Hungary
dic04

Eugenics and Nation in Early 20th Century Hungary

Marius Turda Eugenics and Nation in Early 20th Century Hungary In 1900 Hungary was a regional power in Europe with imperial pretensions; by 1919 it was reduced to the status of a small Central European country, crippled by profound territorial, social and national transformations. This book chronicles the development of eugenic thinking in early twentieth-century Hungary, examining how eugenics was an integral part of this dynamic...

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Leningrad, 1943
nov28

Leningrad, 1943

Alexander Werth Leningrad, 1943: Inside a City Under Siege The 900-day German Siege of Leningrad is the most powerful testimony to the immeasurable cruelty and horror of World War II. As the sole British correspondent to have been in the city during the blockade, Alexander Werth presents a harrowing firsthand account of the savagery and destruction wrought by the Nazis against the civilian population of the city. His writing evokes...

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Mapping the Cold War
nov26

Mapping the Cold War

Timothy Barney Mapping the Cold War Cartography and the Framing of America’s International Power In this fascinating history of Cold War cartography, Timothy Barney considers maps as central to the articulation of ideological tensions between American national interests and international aspirations. Barney argues that the borders, scales, projections, and other conventions of maps prescribed and constrained the means by which foreign...

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Soviet Soft Power in Poland
nov21

Soviet Soft Power in Poland

Patryk Babiracki Soviet Soft Power in Poland Culture and the Making of Stalin’s New Empire, 1943-1957 Concentrating on the formative years of the Cold War from 1943 to 1957, Patryk Babiracki reveals little-known Soviet efforts to build a postwar East European empire through culture. Babiracki argues that the Soviets involved in foreign cultural outreach tried to use “soft power” in order to galvanize broad support for the...

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